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File Upload Size Limits

In php.ini the following parameters impact file uploads:

  • file_uploads
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ini.sect.file_uploads.php#ini.file-uploads
  • upload_tmp_dir
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ini.sect.file_uploads.php#ini.upload-tmp-dir
  • upload_max_filesize
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ini.sect.file_uploads.php#ini.upload-max-filesize
  • post_max_size
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ini.sect.data-handling.php#ini.post-max-size
  • max_input_time
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ref.info.php#ini.max-input-time
  • memory_limit
    http://www.php.net/manual/en/ini.sect.resource-limits.php#ini.memory-limit

Apache might also impose a limit on the size of file uploads using the LimitBodyRequest directive. See http://httpd.apache.org/docs-2.1/ko/mod/core.html#limitrequestbody for details.

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Squid Guard

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Route Table Testing

Use this command:

To test from a specific source use:

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Squid Guard

We’ll start by installing Squid:

Squid is now installed at /usr/local/squid.

Notice that we use the “wget” command to download the software. Then we unpack and build the software. The build sequence is very typical for Linux packages – configure, make, make install.

We finish up by saving the distribution to /root/archive and removing the build
directory that is no longer needed.

Configuration for squid is pretty simple in the basic case. All configuration is
stored in a single file located at /usr/local/squid/etc/squid.conf.

The squid.conf file can be edited with your favoriate text editor. All though there
are hundreds of configuration options only a few are needed in a basic install. We made the following changes:

a. Find the line that looks like this (approx line 684):

Remove the “#” comment from the begining of the line and set the desired cache size and location:

This defines a cache of not more then 768MB of disk storage.

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Squid + NTLM

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